Menstruation Symptoms

Menstruation Symptoms and Sings Your Menstruation Is near

Menstruation Symptoms

Menstruation Symptoms.

What is Menstruation symptoms? Is an important question a young girl child in her puberty age would ask, who might just have experienced her first blood sign of womanhood, she definitely may not want to talk about it, most especially if it occurs at a public place without a preparation of what development is taking place in her internal body system.

Most with first unprepared occurrence felt embarrassed, some felt like, “are my going to die if the blood continues after the first day?” The good news is that, if you get the information early enough before you clock age 11 – 15, you won’t be caught unaware with this sings I’ll share with you. Looking at the medical aspect, I really want to share with you a story about Faith Constantine, titled: “My first Menstruation.”

My 11-year-old daughter and I were on holiday in the Isles of Scilly and we had just finished exploring the beautiful gardens on Tresco. I was waiting patiently with a crowd of people outside a rather small building that was then the “ladies”. Out walked my daughter at long last – head held high with a big grin on her face – “I’ve started my periods” she announced, very excitedly. There were lots of smiles and a few embarrassed shuffles among those gathered by the loo. She then got her phone out and said: “I must text Dad and tell him too.”

We then had a very pleasant mother-and-daughter time walking along the white beaches of Tresco, chatting openly about how this would affect her body, how she would feel, the fact that she could now get pregnant. Looking back on that day, I was so lucky to be able to have the time and space to welcome her into womanhood, and very proud that she felt able to talk normally about it. We then had a very pleasant mother-and-daughter time walking along the white beaches of Tresco, chatting openly about how this would affect her body, how she would feel, the fact that she could now get pregnant. Looking back on that day, I was so lucky to be able to have the time and space to welcome her into womanhood, and very proud that she felt able to talk normally about it. Faith Constantine

Getting your period is a normal part of growing up, and probably you’re reading this article, you’re probably familiar with the signs that your period is approaching… During your period, a little bit of blood comes out of your vagina for a few days and teenage with a first encounter most are helpless.

Menstruation Symptoms and Sings Your Menstruation Is near

What do I need to know about Menstruation?

Menstruation (also known as having your period) is when blood from your uterus drips out of your vagina for a few days every month. You start getting your period during puberty, usually when you’re around 12-15 years old.

Most people get their period every 21-35 days — around once a month (that’s why periods are sometimes called “that time of the month”). The bleeding lasts for 2-7 days — it’s different for everyone. Your period might not always come at the same time each month, especially when you first start getting it. It can take a few years for your period to settle into it’s natural rhythm, and some people never get regular periods throughout their lives.

Also read:Reproductive System: Facts, Functions & Diseases

Your menstrual cycle is what makes your period come every month. It’s controlled by hormones in your body. The purpose of the menstrual cycle is to help your body get ready for pregnancy. Your menstrual cycle = the time from the 1st day of your period to the 1st day of your next period.

Missing your period can be a sign of pregnancy if you’ve had penis-in-vagina sex without using birth control. But there are other reasons your period might be late, too.

There are lots of ways to deal with the blood that comes out of your vagina when you have your period. You can use pads, tampons, or a menstrual cup to collect the blood, so it doesn’t get on your clothes. Some people get cramps or other symptoms before and/or during their period — this is called PMS. to help get a better idea of when your period is coming and what side effects to expect regardless of what’s on your personal pre-period checklist, you’ll usually start noticing the signs 1 to 2 weeks before your period and they’ll go away once bleeding starts.

Some of the most common PMS symptoms are:

  • Breakouts (getting pimples)
  • Bloating (when your belly feels puffy)
  • Cramps (pain in your lower belly or lower back)
  • Breasts changing
  • Feeling tired
  • Mood swings (when your emotions change quickly or you feel sad, angry, or anxious)
  • You have a headache
  • You’re most likely anxious and depressed.

Breaking out. Acne is a very common problem at that time of the month. Adult women suffer from acne much more than men do, and it’s all because of hormones. Rising hormone levels activate sebum (oil) production, which clogs pores and causes pimples as your period is about to start.

You’re bloated and gassy. Water retention is another major complaint. It’s also hormonal, but you can curb premenstrual bloat by cutting out salt, eating more fruits and vegetables, and exercising regularly.

You have cramps. Abdominal cramps are the most frequent menstrual complaint. Unlike many other symptoms, which begin 1 to 2 weeks before your period and end when bleeding starts, cramps usually show up right before show time and last for 2 to 3 days.

Breasts changing. Breast swelling and tenderness is another frequent one. Again, doctors aren’t sure exactly what role hormones play here, but these symptoms could be linked to high levels of prolactin, the breastfeeding hormone.

Feeling tired… but you can’t sleep. Fatigue is a vicious cycle for many women at this point in their cycle. Shifting hormones make you tired, but they also disturb your sleep patterns. In fact, PMS and chronic fatigue syndrome share many of the same symptoms.

Also check:Know Your Health Now

You’ll experience mood swings. All PMS symptoms are caused by hormones, so the emotional signs are just as real as the physical ones. Even though mood swings are seen as one of the classic PMS traits, doctors don’t know exactly why they happen.

You have a headache. Changes in estrogen levels are to blame if you experience headaches leading up to your period. If you’re prone to migraines, you’ll probably find that you get them before your period.

You’re anxious and depressed. Depression and anxiety are doubly linked to PMS. A history of either condition could make your premenstrual symptoms worse. And PMS can also cause both.

This article on "Hkitnob: Health Columns" is for informational purposes only, and is not meant to offer medical advice.