Trying to Conceive: 12 Tips for Women

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Trying to Conceive: 12 Tips for Women
A pregnant Woman

Trying to Conceive: 12 Tips for Women

Every happy married woman is to have a baby of theirs, and would try to do everything they can to conceive during their next cycle when it’s time for childbearing. But it’s important to remember that getting pregnant can take time. You have to optimize women’s fertility, taking better care of their bodies is a good first step. But what else can women do to improve their odds of having a baby?

The most important advice for a woman who wants to get pregnant is to get to know her body, specifically her menstrual cycle. You know, your high school health teacher probably made it sound like you can get pregnant any time you have sex. But in truth, it’s a little more complicated.

How Does Pregnancy takes place

Each month, there are a series of hormonal changes in your body that cause an immature egg in the ovary to grow and mature. Every woman’s cycle is different. This process takes about two weeks on average, beginning with a woman’s menstrual period.

Once the egg is mature, it’s released from the ovary in a process known as ovulation. The egg then travels down the fallopian tube toward the uterus. The egg is only viable for about 24 hours once it has been released.

If the egg is fertilized by a sperm cell during this time frame, the fertilized egg will keep traveling down toward the uterus. It will then implant into the uterine lining.

The key is to have sex in the days before and during ovulation. That way, the sperm cells are in the fallopian tubes when the egg is released. This makes it easier for fertilization to occur. Sperm can survive in the female reproductive tract for up to four or five days.

So, today, I’ll walk every lady/woman who want to conceive with 12 tips how to help getting pregnant, which are: 

1. Getting the timing right

The best way to increase your odds of getting pregnant quickly is to make sure that you are having sex at the right time in your cycle.

If you have regular cycles, you will ovulate around two weeks before your period. This means your fertile window will be the seven days before your expected

2. Record menstrual cycle frequency

A woman who wants to have a baby should monitor whether the first days of her periods tend to come the same number of days apart every month, which is considered regular. Conversely, her periods may be irregular, meaning her cycle lengths vary from month to month. By tracking this information on a calendar, a woman can better predict when she might be ovulating, which is the time when her ovaries will release an egg every month.

There are several methods women can use to help determine their most fertile days each month. Another method to predict ovulation is to track cervical mucus, which involves a woman regularly checking both the amount and appearance of mucus in her vagina. Just before ovulation when a woman is most fertile, the amount of mucus increases and it also becomes thinner, clearer and more slippery, according to the March of Dimes. When cervical mucus becomes more slippery, it can help sperm make its way to the egg. A study published in the journal Fertility and Sterility found that women who checked their cervical mucus consistently were 2.3 times more likely to get pregnant over a six-month period.

Also check:How To Improve Male Fertility Fast

3. Measuring body Temperature

By measuring your basal body temperature every morning before getting out of bed, you might be able to detect a very slight rise in temperature for three mornings in a row. The temperature rise may be as little as half of a degree. This can be a signal of your fertile window and indicates that you should have sex.

This method isn’t always reliable because there are a lot of different factors (like infection) that can cause a rise in temperature. Some women also find it difficult to detect that rise in temperature.

4. Have sex every other day during the fertile window

The “fertile window” spans a six-day interval, the five days prior to ovulation and the day of it, according to the American Society for Reproductive Medicine. These are the days each month when a woman is most fertile.

Some women are turning to new technology tools, such as fertility tracking apps and websites, to help them keep tabs on when they may be more likely to conceive, but a study done in 2016 suggests the apps may not be that accurate.

Research has shown that there hasn’t been a big difference in pregnancy rates between couples who had sex every day during the “fertile window” (37 percent) compared with couples who did it every other day (33 percent). “And having sex every other day might be easier for a couple to pull off.”

5. Eat a Bigger Breakfast

Eating a substantial breakfast may help women with fertility problems. One study found that eating a larger breakfast may improve the hormonal effects of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a major cause of infertility.

For normal weight women with PCOS, eating most of their calories at breakfast reduced insulin levels by 8% and testosterone levels by 50%. High levels of either can contribute to infertility (11).

However, it’s important to note that increasing the size of your breakfast without reducing the size of your evening meal is likely to lead to weight gain.

6. Strive for a healthy body weight

Being too heavy can reduce a woman’s odds of conceiving, but being too thin can make it even harder to have a baby.

Research has shown that a woman who is overweight can take twice as long to become pregnant than a woman whose BMI is considered normal, and a woman who is underweight might take four times as long to conceive.

Having too much body fat produces excess estrogen, which can interfere with ovulation. Losing 5 to 10 percent of body weight before a woman starts trying to get pregnant could improve her fertility, according to the American Society for Reproductive Medicine.

A study done in 2017 found that couples in which both partners are obese may take from 55 to 59 percent longer to become pregnant, compared with couples who are not obese.

7. Eat More Fiber

Fiber helps your body get rid of excess hormones and keeps blood sugar balanced. Some examples of high-fiber foods are whole grains, fruits, vegetables and beans. Certain types of fiber can help remove excess estrogen by binding to it in the intestines. The excess estrogen is then removed from the body as a waste product.

One study found that eating 10 grams more cereal fiber per day was associated with a 44% lower risk of ovulatory infertility among women older than 32 years (16).

However, the evidence on fiber is mixed. In another study of 250 women aged 18 to 44, eating the recommended 20-35 grams of fiber per day was associated with a nearly 10 times higher risk of abnormal ovulation cycles.

8. Take a prenatal vitamin

A study recommends that women who are attempting to conceive start taking a prenatal vitamin even before becoming pregnant. This way a woman can find one that’s more agreeable to her system and stay on it during pregnancy.

Also the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention urges women to take 400 mcg of folic acid every day for at least one month before getting pregnant to help prevent birth defects.

Getting a head start on folic acid supplementation is a good idea because the neural tube develops into the brain and spine 3 to 4 weeks after conception occurs, before many women may realize they’re expecting.

9. Eat healthy foods

Although there may not be a specific fertility-promoting diet, eating a variety of healthy foods can help prepare a woman’s body for pregnancy by giving her adequate stores of critical nutrients such as calcium, protein and iron. This means eating a variety of fruits and vegetables, lean protein, whole grains, dairy and healthy sources of fat.

When trying to get pregnant, eat lower amounts of high-mercury fish, such as swordfish, shark, king mackerel, and tilefish. And limit albacore (white) tuna to 6-ounces per week to reduce exposure to this toxic metal, the Food and Drug Administration recommends. Also, go easy on caffeine: Consuming more than 500 milligrams of caffeine a day has been linked with a decrease in fertility in women. Having 1 to 2 cups of coffee, or less than 250 mg of caffeine, per day before becoming pregnant appears to have no impact on the likelihood of conception, according to the American Society for Reproductive Medicine.

10. Cut back on strenuous workouts

Being physically active most days of the week can help a woman’s body prepare for the demands of pregnancy and labor. But getting too much exercise or doing frequent strenuous workouts could interfere with ovulation.

11. Do away from smoking and drinking habits

Smoking can lead to fertility problems in both women and men. Chemicals found in cigarette smoke, such as nicotine and carbon monoxide, speed up the loss rate of a woman’s eggs, according to the American Society for Reproductive Medicine.

Smoking ages a woman’s ovaries and depletes her supply of eggs prematurely, according to the Mayo Clinic.

It’s safest for a woman to avoid alcohol when she is hoping to become pregnant. A woman should also stop consuming alcohol if she stops using birth control because she wants to get pregnant.

Drinking alcohol at moderate (one to two drinks per day) or heavy levels (more than two drinks per day) can make it difficult for a woman to get pregnant, according to The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.
Once a woman becomes pregnant, there’s no safe amount of alcohol as proven by some medical experts.

12. Adopt swap Protein Sources

Replacing some animal proteins (such as meat, fish and eggs) with vegetable protein sources (such as beans, nuts and seeds) is linked to a reduced risk of infertility ( https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17978119 2 ).
One study found that a higher protein intake from meat was linked to a 32% higher chance of developing ovulatory infertility. On the other hand, eating more vegetable protein may protect against infertility.

A study showed that when 5% of total calories came from vegetable protein instead of animal protein, the risk of ovulatory infertility decreased by more than 50%. Therefore, consider replacing some of the meat protein in your diet with protein from vegetables, beans, lentils and nuts.

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